Dual Booting and Linux question

FAQ, getting help, user experience about FancyCache
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s1vh
Level 1
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Joined: Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:06 am

Dual Booting and Linux question

Post by s1vh »

Greetings. I have been searching some type of hybrid storage for my laptop, since I need it for my career. Hybrid drives have as much as 8 GB NAND memory wich is not enough for the applications I need to run, and there are not many laptops with Intel's H77 wich is the only laptop chipset with Smart Response enabled. There is the Dataplex software, compatible with many SSD, but I really need to work with dual booting (I use GRUB 2 right now). It is a shame that a retail product such that one does not supports dual booting. Then I finally found your project, "FancyCache" and it looked like a decent solution. It might be already answered on forums but I found nothing, and it says nothing neither its features: does FancyCache support dual booting? -I did not tested it because I have not the SSD yet.

And ever I know there's not Linux support, are you thinking of supporting it on the future? It is not as important to me, because Windows suffers of drive issues and disk fragmentation a way more, but I am just asking. Thanks!
minhgi
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Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 3:52 pm

Re: Dual Booting and Linux question

Post by minhgi »

I do triple boot mine. Ubuntu 13.04, Windows 8, OSX 10.8.4 on the same hardrive.

Fancycache should work for you as well. Welcome to the forum.
dustyny
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Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2012 12:54 am

Re: Dual Booting and Linux question

Post by dustyny »

Yes you can use Fancycache in a dual/triple/quadrupedal boot but you'll only be able to use in Windows, there are similar product available on Linux (bCache).
Windows suffers of drive issues and disk fragmentation a way more
Sorry but this is not true.. NTFS is fairly resilient to fragmentation and has an excellent protective mechanisms. ReFS in the latest version of Win8/2012 works very similarly to some of the filesystems found in Linux. The only truly superior file system is ZFS but that is only really useful on Unix systems (the Linux version has to use FUSE which is slower).
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